Narration: A girl living a life of action, travel and courage. Thought and motion are the same brilliant thing. Her mind and body make and indivisible genius. She braely notices herself going from girl-hero to woman-hero - such is a life of action. Then, one day, a shot is fired, and half her body is stolen. But she’s got strength and spirit to burn. She makes a new kind of action, travel, motion, and combat for herself - purely of the mind. She’s a new hero, ina wheelchair, with a river of information at her feet and a mind like a flashing dagger. But she moves and fights purely in a world of systems now, and there’s a hidden danger to that which she doesn’t see.

Tim contemplates Oracle in Robin 120.

Narration: A girl living a life of action, travel and courage. Thought and motion are the same brilliant thing. Her mind and body make and indivisible genius. She braely notices herself going from girl-hero to woman-hero - such is a life of action. Then, one day, a shot is fired, and half her body is stolen. But she’s got strength and spirit to burn. She makes a new kind of action, travel, motion, and combat for herself - purely of the mind. She’s a new hero, ina wheelchair, with a river of information at her feet and a mind like a flashing dagger. But she moves and fights purely in a world of systems now, and there’s a hidden danger to that which she doesn’t see.

Tim contemplates Oracle in Robin 120.

image

One of Cassandra’s earliest appearances after No Man’s Land was Gotham Knights 2. It’s very much a character study, focusing on her trauma, and how Batman tries to help her through it.

The conceit of early Gotham Knights was Hugo Strange doing case files on the Bats. The story is narrated by him, a private casefile overlaying a troubled mission.

Read More


A splash page of Batgirl leaping over a car.

Batman: Batgirl

A splash page of Batgirl leaping over a car.

Batman: Batgirl


Barbara is taking a ride home with two police officers when they’re called in for an assualt. They handle it, but the suspect is getting away.
Until Barbara kicks the car door into him. WHAAM!
"You guys lose something?"

Batman: Batgirl

Barbara is taking a ride home with two police officers when they’re called in for an assualt. They handle it, but the suspect is getting away.

Until Barbara kicks the car door into him. WHAAM!

"You guys lose something?"

Batman: Batgirl


Barbara is holding a newspaper with the headline “Mysterious Batgirl Saves Socialite”. In the middle of the page is a neat but inaccurate rendition of Batgirl, snarling as she crouches in a fighting stance.
Below is the beginning of an article titled Killer Moth Trounced By Teen:
"GOTHAM CITY - A new, mysterious creature of the night made her society debut this evening at a dinner attended by Gotham’s elite. Swooping onto the scene, she proved to more than gatecrashing "Killer Moth" could handle. "Moth" disrupted the main course, chicken fried lobster, at about 8:30. There was - 

Batman: Batgirl

Barbara is holding a newspaper with the headline “Mysterious Batgirl Saves Socialite”. In the middle of the page is a neat but inaccurate rendition of Batgirl, snarling as she crouches in a fighting stance.

Below is the beginning of an article titled Killer Moth Trounced By Teen:

"GOTHAM CITY - A new, mysterious creature of the night made her society debut this evening at a dinner attended by Gotham’s elite. Swooping onto the scene, she proved to more than gatecrashing "Killer Moth" could handle. "Moth" disrupted the main course, chicken fried lobster, at about 8:30. There was - 

Batman: Batgirl


Barbara Gordon: When I turned out to be too liberal for re-election, I wound up as an associate director at Humanities Research and Develpoment, INC. I was working towards the same goals, but at a local level

- Flawed Gems

Barbara Gordon: When I turned out to be too liberal for re-election, I wound up as an associate director at Humanities Research and Develpoment, INC. I was working towards the same goals, but at a local level

- Flawed Gems

Belated birthday post for Cassandra Cain!

I thought it would be appropriate to celebrate and examine Cass’s very first appearance.

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deantrippe:

projectrooftop:

Yes, Rooftop Readers, the time has come to go back to the beginning.
February 28th will mark Project: Rooftop’s eighth anniversary. Following the absolutely insane response to the Draw Batgirl Meme in 2006, sparked by a blog post from the incredible Andi Watson, and fueled by original Batgirl redesigns by me and my friend Jamie Dee Galey, I pulled together some of my comics pals to create a venue to share, discuss, and celebrate the very specific art of redesigning superhero costumes. Here, we have tried to promote the idea that superhero costume redesigns require a particular set of skills and and demand thoughtful consideration. We found allies. We made an impact.
Since our inception, many of our artists have become top names in the superhero redesign game. Many of them were well on their way to superstar status (or had already achieved it), but here at Project: Rooftop, we’re proud to claim as contributors Ming Doyle, Joe Quinones, Kris Anka, Annie Wu, Stuart Immonen, Jamie McKelvie, and so many others who have made significant impacts in the world of mainstream superhero costuming and design. Superhero costume redesigns have become more frequent, more discussed, and more regularly credited, during our eight year tenure as the self-appointed high priests of superhero fashion.
Looking back on the original Draw Batgirl Meme, followed quickly by Draw Supergirl, Draw Green Lantern, Draw Superboy, and others that never had quite the zeitgeist, lightning-in-a-bottle nature of their predecessor, it’s easy to see why Batgirl attracted so many more designers. In modern continuity, the Batgirl most of us know, Barbara Gordon, was the first character to appropriate the iconography of Batman for herself, making it her own, without permission or apology. Like Batman, Batgirl is a hero without superpowers, but hardly without power. Her crimefighting skills and determined will are forces that defeat fictional villains and inspire real readers.
But there have been many Batgirls, of course. Bill Finger and Sheldon Moldoff’s original Bat-Girl, Betty Kane, was the sidekick of the first Batwoman. Cassandra Cain took up the mantle in an Alex Maleev designed costume in 1999, and became a fan favorite in the hands of her co-creators, Kelley Puckett and Damion Scott. In 2009, former Spoiler and Robin, Stephanie Brown, threw on a Lee Garbett designed cape as the Chuck Dixon and Tom Lyle created character took on her third costumed alias.
And there have been so many others, in various other worlds and short stories, and that’s not even taking all the Batwomen into account. Basically, to create a Batgirl, you need a girl and you need a bat-symbol. The thousand-plus permutations seen in just the first week of Draw Batgirl attested to that. For this contest, we are allowing ALL CONCEPTS. No restrictions. Redesign any of the previous Batgirls or create your own! Girl + Bat = Batgirl. The top entries will be judged and featured here on the site.
As usual, check our guidelines, include your name and website, and send your art as an attachment in .jpg, .png, or .gif format to projectrooftop@gmail.com.
PLEASE FORMAT THE FILE NAME AS “artist-name-character.format” as this will save me a ton of time renaming your files.
And for eight years of making Project: Rooftop one of the most well regarded outlets for awesome art and whopping levels of talent, I’d like to extend a sincere thanks to our co-founder Chris Arrant and our contributors Vito Delsante, Joel Priddy, Jon Morris, Rachel Eddidin, Jessica Plummer, and Glen Weldon. Thank you all so very much.
Thanks also to every designer out there who has sent us their art, linked to our events, and visited our little art party over the years. It’s an honor for all of us to offer this space. I love comics and superheroes, and of everything I’ve done in my career to promote the medium and genre that literally saved my life, Project: Rooftop is one of the things I’m most proud of helping create.
And that’s enough self-back-patting to last us a couple more years. You’ve got one month. Get drawing! -Dean
Entries for Batgirl Begins Again must be received by February 28th, 2014.
Contest logo designed by Paul Milligan and Dean Trippe.

BATGIRL REDESIGN CONTEST AT PROJECT: ROOFTOP!

deantrippe:

projectrooftop:

Yes, Rooftop Readers, the time has come to go back to the beginning.

February 28th will mark Project: Rooftop’s eighth anniversary. Following the absolutely insane response to the Draw Batgirl Meme in 2006, sparked by a blog post from the incredible Andi Watson, and fueled by original Batgirl redesigns by me and my friend Jamie Dee Galey, I pulled together some of my comics pals to create a venue to share, discuss, and celebrate the very specific art of redesigning superhero costumes. Here, we have tried to promote the idea that superhero costume redesigns require a particular set of skills and and demand thoughtful consideration. We found allies. We made an impact.

Since our inception, many of our artists have become top names in the superhero redesign game. Many of them were well on their way to superstar status (or had already achieved it), but here at Project: Rooftop, we’re proud to claim as contributors Ming Doyle, Joe Quinones, Kris Anka, Annie Wu, Stuart Immonen, Jamie McKelvie, and so many others who have made significant impacts in the world of mainstream superhero costuming and design. Superhero costume redesigns have become more frequent, more discussed, and more regularly credited, during our eight year tenure as the self-appointed high priests of superhero fashion.

Looking back on the original Draw Batgirl Meme, followed quickly by Draw Supergirl, Draw Green Lantern, Draw Superboy, and others that never had quite the zeitgeist, lightning-in-a-bottle nature of their predecessor, it’s easy to see why Batgirl attracted so many more designers. In modern continuity, the Batgirl most of us know, Barbara Gordon, was the first character to appropriate the iconography of Batman for herself, making it her own, without permission or apology. Like Batman, Batgirl is a hero without superpowers, but hardly without power. Her crimefighting skills and determined will are forces that defeat fictional villains and inspire real readers.

But there have been many Batgirls, of course. Bill Finger and Sheldon Moldoff’s original Bat-Girl, Betty Kane, was the sidekick of the first Batwoman. Cassandra Cain took up the mantle in an Alex Maleev designed costume in 1999, and became a fan favorite in the hands of her co-creators, Kelley Puckett and Damion Scott. In 2009, former Spoiler and Robin, Stephanie Brown, threw on a Lee Garbett designed cape as the Chuck Dixon and Tom Lyle created character took on her third costumed alias.

And there have been so many others, in various other worlds and short stories, and that’s not even taking all the Batwomen into account. Basically, to create a Batgirl, you need a girl and you need a bat-symbol. The thousand-plus permutations seen in just the first week of Draw Batgirl attested to that. For this contest, we are allowing ALL CONCEPTS. No restrictions. Redesign any of the previous Batgirls or create your own! Girl + Bat = Batgirl. The top entries will be judged and featured here on the site.

As usual, check our guidelines, include your name and website, and send your art as an attachment in .jpg, .png, or .gif format to projectrooftop@gmail.com.

PLEASE FORMAT THE FILE NAME AS “artist-name-character.format” as this will save me a ton of time renaming your files.

And for eight years of making Project: Rooftop one of the most well regarded outlets for awesome art and whopping levels of talent, I’d like to extend a sincere thanks to our co-founder Chris Arrant and our contributors Vito Delsante, Joel Priddy, Jon Morris, Rachel Eddidin, Jessica Plummer, and Glen Weldon. Thank you all so very much.

Thanks also to every designer out there who has sent us their art, linked to our events, and visited our little art party over the years. It’s an honor for all of us to offer this space. I love comics and superheroes, and of everything I’ve done in my career to promote the medium and genre that literally saved my life, Project: Rooftop is one of the things I’m most proud of helping create.

And that’s enough self-back-patting to last us a couple more years. You’ve got one month. Get drawing! -Dean

Entries for Batgirl Begins Again must be received by February 28th, 2014.

Contest logo designed by Paul Milligan and Dean Trippe.

BATGIRL REDESIGN CONTEST AT PROJECT: ROOFTOP!

(via daggerpen)

I find many of the comparisons between Barbara and Stephanie rather contrived, forcing Barbara into a narrative that doesn’t quite fit. From the beginning, they approached being a vigilante in different ways, through different methods. Barbara’s story is not Stephanie’s story, and it shouldn’t be.

However, that doesn’t mean there aren’t rich comparisons to draw!

The more Dad drank, the more Marcy and our heroes became my refuge. But that didn’t make the problem go away. I loved him so much. But he lied to me, again and again. 

In Flawed Gems, the first post-Crisis Batgirl story, we’re introduced to a new background for Barbara. In this continuity, Jim Gordon was her adoptive father; his brother, Roger, was her birth father. Her mother, Thelma, died when she was very young, and Roger didn’t take it well; he turned to alcohol. 

Barbara, meanwhile, turned to super heroes. 

She delved into fantasies where she could fly, where she had control, where the good people were safe. When her father died - when her entire world changed - she took comfort in Gotham’s hero. 

Her first impulse towards becoming a vigilante was thinking Batman needed a partner. 

Over the years Dad was in and out of Blackgate. Mostly in. And every visit he’d complain about Batman. He really hated Batman. For someone reason I loved that. - Daddy’s Little Vigilante

Stephanie, of course, had problems with her own father. Roger, at least, loved Barbara; there’s no evidence that Arthur ever gave a damn about his daughter. (Well, there’s War Crimes, but fuck War Crimes.)

She didn’t have any control, either. She couldn’t protect herself or her mother. She couldn’t make their lives better.

As a child, she too dreamed of flying. Older, she looked to the stars, and took comfort in the one man who could, at least for a while, keep them safe.

And then she decided that she could do it, too. 

Both Barbara and Stephanie were comforted and inspired by heroes, and ultimately became them.